It’s time to start talking about
mental illness. Start here.

Totally having an ADD moment.
Do you really have ADD?
Yea, I was diagnosed as a kid.
animating texting dots
I have problems paying attention too.
I didn't know. How bad is it?



What can you say?
Complete the Conversation.

Nice response!
Well... ADD is a little more serious.
Thanks for doing this.
Let's keep the conversation going.
Next »
I have problems paying attention too.
I didn't know. How bad is it?
How are you?
Eh. Not great. My anxiety is acting up again.
animating texting dots
Really? What's going on?
We've all been there.



What can you say?
Complete the Conversation.

Perfect. Questions are great.
Sorry. We have not all been there.
Thanks for doing this.
Let's keep the conversation going.
Next »
Really? What's going on?
We've all been there.
Aaarrrgggh.
?
I'm just feeling really anxious
Oh, you're fine.
No, I mean...it's bad.
animating texting dots
Maybe you can see somebody about it?
You're Ok. Deep breath.



What can you say?
Complete the Conversation.

You clearly know when someone is trying to open up.
This doesn't help as much as you think.
Thanks for doing this.
Let's keep the conversation going.
Next »
Maybe you can see somebody about it?
You're Ok. Deep breath.
I have to go to the doctor today.
Just a checkup?
No. Not sure if you knew, but I've got depression.
animating texting dots
No you don't. Lighten up.
I'm sorry to hear that. Can I help?



What can you say?
Complete the Conversation.

Great!
It is impossible to cheer away depression.
Thanks for doing this.
Let's keep the conversation going.
Next »
No you don't. Lighten up.
I'm sorry to hear that. Can I help?
I'm feeling really down lately.
What's going on?
Maybe it's the news. But everything is so depressing.
animating texting dots
Are you sure you're feeling OK?
Well...don't watch the news anymore.



What can you say?
Complete the Conversation.

Some people misuse the word "depressing." Thanks for checking.
The person could really be depressed. Why not check?
Thanks for doing this.
Let's keep the conversation going.
Next »
Are you sure you're feeling OK?
Well...don't watch the news anymore.
Matias: His older brother has PTSD
Heidi: Diagnosed with bipolar disorder in 2011
Artie: Caring for his wife who has schizophrenia
Monica: Knows a coworker with an eating disorder
Irma: Her daughter has been living with OCD

1 in 5 adults in the US experience mental illness in a given year.

Learn about mental Illness

Can you recognize
mental illness stigma?

1 out of 10

Have you ever distanced yourself from someone after learning they have a mental illness?

Have you ever thought a coworker was less capable of doing their job because of a mental illness?

Have you ever called someone crazy, nuts, or insane?

Have you ever told a friend who is feeling depressed to snap out of it?

Have you ever been afraid to say something to a person with a mental illness for fear of their reaction?

Have you ever thought someone was claiming a mental illness just to get attention?

Are you less sympathetic to mental illnesses than other ailments like diabetes or heart disease?

Do you think the relationship would be tarnished if someone close to you revealed a mental illness?

Are some mental illnesses scary to you?

Would you feel uncomfortable if an acquaintance shared their mental illness with you?

Thanks

You didn’t answer “yes” to any questions. Perfect! Teach others to stamp out stigma and #MakeItOK by sharing this quiz.

Share this quiz » Take the pledge »

Thanks

You answered “yes” to only one question. Great! Teach others to stamp out stigma and #MakeItOK by sharing this quiz.

Share this quiz » Take the pledge »

Thanks

You answered "yes" on just XX questions. This is great! Please don’t feel bad for admitting a few mistakes. We’re all human.

Share this quiz » Take the pledge »

Thanks

You answered "yes" on XX questions. We’re so happy you’re here because it seems like you could use a little bit of coaching.

Share this quiz » Explore Tips for Talking »

What is stigma?

Stigma: a set of negative and often unfair beliefs that a society has about something.

What does mental illness stigma look like?

Exclusion. Telling someone to toughen up or snap out of it. Silence. Calling someone “crazy.” Treating mental illness as a fallacy for the lazy or attention starved.

Where did mental illness stigma start?

It’s been around for a long time. Society has always viewed mental illness as a sign of weakness. But in the last half-century, we’ve discovered so much more about how the brain works, yet the stigma remains.

Where did it start?

Society has always viewed mental illness as a sign of weakness. But in the last half-century, we’ve discovered so much more about how the brain works.

The effect?

People who have a mental illness feel ashamed. They hide. They don’t get the help or treatment they need.

What you can do?

Talk. Listen. Replace awkward silence with questions and understanding. Become a voice against mental illness stigma. Spread the word that mental illnesses are often chemical imbalances that can be alleviated with proper medication.

What can you do?

Talk. Listen. Become a voice against mental illness stigma. Spread the word that mental illnesses common.

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What stigma looks like

Mental illness stigma comes in many forms. Exclusion, silence, and labeling are just a few. Click below to hear firsthand experiences.

9,212 people have pledged to stop mental illness stigma.

By signing this pledge, you’re taking a stand against the mental illness stigma. Pass it on. Print it out. Tape it up. It can serve as a reminder to start more conversations and stop the labeling. Together, we can Make It OK.

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